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Section Breaks in Word

SECTION BREAKS IN WORD

Applies to:  Word 2016, Word 2013, Word 2010, Word 2007, Word 2003

Section breaks in Word are vital to grasp if you are creating long documents with different headers and footers, mixing portrait and landscape or working with different numbers of columns.

There are two main types of section break:

  • Next page
  • Continuous

You can also choose to start a Next Page break on an Even Page or Odd Page.  This is useful if you are doing doubled-sided (duplex) printing and always want the new section to start on the front of the page rather than the reverse side.

NEXT PAGE SECTION BREAKS

Next Page Section breaks are always required in a document that has different headers and footers or a mixture of portrait and landscape because these features are page formatting features.  Page formatting features are features that can only be applied to whole pages rather than paragraphs or selected  text.

CONTINUOUS SECTION BREAKS

You need to use Continuous Section breaks if you want to change the column layout from one to more or vice versa on the same page (see later)

HOW TO SET UP A SECTION BREAK IN WORD

  • Place the cursor where you want the section break to occur

Word 2003

Step 1

From the Insert tab

Step 2

Click Break

Step 3

From Section break types

Word 2007

Step 1

From the Page Layout tab

Step 2

In the Page Setup group

Step 3

Click the down arrow to the right of Breaks

Step 4

From Section breaks

Word 2010

Step 1

From the Page Layout tab

Step 2

In the Page Setup group

Step 3

Click the down arrow to the right of Breaks

Step 4

From Section breaks

Word 2013

Step 1

From the Layout tab

Step 2

In the Page Setup group

Step 3

Click the down arrow to the right of Breaks

Step 4

From Section breaks

Word 2016

Step 1

From the Layout tab

Step 2

In the Page Setup group

Step 3

Click the down arrow to the right of Breaks

Step 4

From Section Breaks

  • Select Next Page or Continuous

Note: Like the Page break, a Section break does not show in your document when you are editing it unless you have the Show/Hide feature turned on.

Section Breaks Marker

USING SECTION BREAKS IN WORD TO SET UP DIFFERENT HEADERS AND FOOTERS

Sometimes in a document you need particular headers or footers at certain points in the document.  The most common situation is perhaps when you wish to add an appendix with its own page numbering, or a series of schedules in legal work.  Or you may wish to divide your document into Chapters or other types of section, each with their own page numbering starting again from 1.

Note: if you only need the first page to be different (for example if you don’t want the first page of a letter or report to have a number) you don’t need to set up a section break – there is a special Different first page feature.  Similarly, if you need odd and even pages to have different headers and footers there is a special Different odd and even feature for that.

SET UP DIFFERENT HEADERS OR FOOTERS

  • Insert your Next Page section break
  • Go to the Header (or Footer) at the top (or bottom) of your first page in order to edit your 1st section Header (or Footer)
First Section Header

{Word 2016 example)

  • Type the text of your Header (or Footer) or insert a page number,  date or document info option e.g. filename
  • Go to the top (or bottom) of the first page of the next section:

Word 2003

Step 1

From the pop-up Header and Footer Design toolbar

Step 2

Click image Show Next

Word 2007

Step 1

From the Design tab under Header and Footer Tools

Step 2

In the Navigation group

Step 3

Click Next

Word 2010

Step 1

From the Design tab under Header and Footer Tools

Step 2

In the Navigation group

Step 3

Click Next

Word 2013

Step 1

From the Design tab under Header and Footer Tools

Step 2

In the Navigation group

Step 3

Click Next

Word 2016

Step 1

From the Design tab under Header and Footer Tools

Step 2

In the Navigation group

Step 3

Click Next

  • Break the link with the previous section by clicking Link to Previous
  • Type in your Header (or Footer) for the current section
  • Repeat from Step 1 for each section in your document

USING SECTION BREAKS IN WORD TO ADD A LANDSCAPE PAGE TO A PORTRAIT DOCUMENT (AND VICE VERSA)

When mixing landscape and portrait pages in a document you need to use Next Page section breaks each time you change:

  • Place your cursor where you want to change from landscape to portrait {or vice versa)
  • Insert a Next Page section break
  • Select your Page Orientation, Landscape or Portrait

USING SECTION BREAKS IN WORD TO SET UP MORE COLUMNS

When you want to set up two columns or more on the same page of your document (i.e. without starting a new page) you need to use a Continuous Page section break:

  • Place your cursor where you want to change the number of columns on your page
  • Insert a Continuous Page section break
  • Go ahead and select the number of columns you want

To change back to a single column, repeat the above steps, selecting One column at the last step.

Mixed columns on page

DELETE A SECTION BREAK IN WORD

To delete a section break you first need to click the Show/Hide button (from the Home tab) to reveal the paragraph symbols and Section Break markers.

Then click in the left margin to select (highlight) the whole Section Break marker and press the Delete key (Del) or the Backspace Delete key:

Section Break Next Page

Section Break (Next Page) showing “Show/Hide” symbol at beginning

MOVE A SECTION BREAK IN WORD

You can move a section break by selecting it as above and cutting and pasting it but… beware! It may change the format of your document unexpectedly.

Paste Options in Word

Paste Options in Word

Applies to:  Word 2016, Word 2013, Word 2010, Word 2007, Word 2003

Cut and pasteEveryone knows about “cut and paste” but most people only use it as a very basic tool.  They are unaware of the huge power of Paste Options in Word.  I am going to delve into this amazing Microsoft Word tool and give you some fascinating insights in how to speed up your daily work and produce documents that have a consistent look and feel.

 

First let’s examine how you are using Cut and Paste (or Copy and Paste) in Word.  When you have selected your text do you use the ribbon/toolbar picture buttons for Cut and Copy?

Cut copy and paste options on ribbonOr do you right click with the mouse and choose Cut or Copy ? Perhaps you use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl-X and Ctrl-C? Any of these is fine.  They all do the job.  It is what you do next that is important – how are you pasting the text into the new location in your document or another document?  This is where your Paste Options in Word come in.

Note: I shall from now on in this article mostly refer to Copy and Paste because that’s probably what you do most often, leaving the original text where it is.  However, the Paste Options in Word that we are examining apply equally to Cut and Paste, where you are moving the text from one place to another and in effect deleting the original text.

How to find and apply Paste Options in Word

So you have copied your text and now you want to paste it in a different location.  Place your cursor where you want to paste the text.

  • Right click with the mouse (right click is always my preferred option – much quicker I find)

or

  • Click the arrow underneath the Paste button on the ribbon/toolbar, (Home tab on the ribbon)

Paste Options button

You now are faced with a potentially bewildering set of options!

  • Keep Source Formatting
  • Merge Formatting
  • Picture
  • Keep Text Only

I shall explain:

Keep Source Formatting

Text that you have copied from another location will bring all its formatting with it – styles, fonts, attributes and more.

In other words, the copied text will look almost exactly as it did in the original location, and may not match the surrounding text.

Attention!Not to be recommended unless you absolutely know what you are doing and are copying from the same document or another of your own documents or a set of professionally designed documents customised for your company.  This is the default normally when you don’t choose options – however, you can change the default and I will deal with this in later articles.

Merge Formatting

Text that you have copied from another location will try to match the formatting of the surrounding text.

The result of this sometimes looks like the “Text Only” option but the difference is that it will still bring in paragraph formatting such as automatic numbering and bullets.  This could be useful if you are copying and pasting lists

Keep Text Only

Text that you have copied from another location will remove all the original formatting from the text.

This is probably the safest option for you to use, but if you are copying and pasting large chunks of text that has a lot of formatting you will need to reapply the formatting.

Attention!If you are copying automatically numbered and bulleted lists this will be very annoying because it will show the numbers and bullets as characters but will not retain the automatic feature

Which of the Paste Options in Word should I choose?

With all this somewhat confusing information, what is the best way to choose your Paste Option?  Well, Microsoft helps you by showing you what each option would look like when you hover over the option with the mouse Mouse.  If in doubt, choose the “Keep Text Only” option and be prepared to reformat your text a little to tidy up.

An easy way to remember Ctrl-X, Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V?

Have you ever forgotten which is which and wondered why it is Ctrl-V for paste and not Ctrl-P?  Well, these keyboard shortcuts go back a long way to  before a mouse even existed (in the computing sense, that is!).  In those days we had to use the keyboard for all commands, and they were part of a whole family.  Usually the letter used with the Control key is the first letter of the command, but in this case Ctrl-P was already being used for the Print command.  So why V?  Maybe the originators of these commands had more than one reason for choosing V?

For those of you who (like myself) have a deeper interest in these things there is a fascinating forum thread here https://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/86877/why-ctrl-c-for-copy-but-not-ctrl-p-for-paste

However, I like to think of it like this:

The three keys X,C and V are right next to each other on the QWERTY keyboard and very close to the Ctrl-key on the left [keyboard image].

Remember:

  • Ctrl-X for Cut (looks like a pair of skissors) and deletes the original text
  • Ctrl-C for Copy (C for copy)
  • Ctrl-V for Paste (you are moVing) text here and V is right next to C on the keyboard

How to work faster using quick keys for Cut/Copy and Paste

If you are having to do a large volume of copying and pasting,  once you have decided on your preferred method of pasting for a particular piece of work you can do the following:

  • Make sure that you have set your default paste options
  • Arrange the two documents side by side
  • Click with the mouse to select the text from the document you are copying from
  • Use Ctrl-C to copy the text
  • Use Ctrl-V to paste the text

Job done!   Satsified smiley face

 

How can I add a second monitor to my desktop PC?

How can I add a second monitor to my desktop PC?

Having a second or even a third monitor for your PC is definitely becoming a must have requirement for many work environments. One thing is for sure that once you have more then one monitor you will never want to go back to just one!

There are a number of ways that adding additional monitors can be be achieved and the solution that works for you will depend on a number of things:

Does your PC have an additional monitor port and if so what type of port is it DVI, VGA or HDMI? If your PC has a second monitor port it may not be the same type as the first port.

What type of ports does your second monitor have – again DVI, VGA or HDMI? Some monitors may have a combination of DVI & VGA.

Given the above different scenarios there are a number of ways you can solve the problems.

Only one port on your PC

Solution 1:

If you are comfortable opening up your PC, it may be possible to buy a second video card and add additional ports. But this will require you to ensure that the second video card that you buy is either compatible with the existing video card or if not has two ports that match the available ports on your monitor.

There also needs to be an available video card slot in your mother board (of the right type) and in addition to that the card needs to fit into the port housing at the back of the PC.

You can see why this option is only for someone that really knows what they are doing and understands the technologies well.

From a cost perspective a second video card can cost from around £40.00 upwards.

Solution 2:

A far simpler way to add additional ports to your PC is to buy a USB 2.0 to DVI Full HD Adapter with VGA and HDMI Adapters. This basically allows you to connect your additional monitor using a USB port
and then connect to a monitor of any type (DVI, VGA or HDMI).

It literally is plug and play, you simply install what’s known as driver software using a disc that comes with the adapter, follow a few basic instructions, connect your second monitor and reboot. Voila, you are off and running in 10 minutes.

At the time of writing we recommend the adapter below that costs £49.99 from Maplins – who we are
happy to recommend as the staff in the Beovis Valley branch in Southampton are fantastic.

The great thing about this solution is that if you change your PC or get a new monitor, it is guaranteed to work!

Two ports on your PC but the second port does not match your monitor port.

There are various adapters available that will allow you to overcome the problem with VGA to DVI adapters similar to the one below costing only a few pounds.

If you have a device with HDMI output and a screen with DVI input, or vice versa, you can convert between the formats with an HDMI to DVI adapter cable.

VGA to HDMI adapters are available at a greater cost, but not all may be bidirectional and require more investigation and thought.

Conclusion

I have tried to keep the above explanation as simple as possible without going into detail on the difference betweeen VGA, DVI & HDMI.

My best advice is do not invest in anything until you are sure that the solution you have chosen is correct.  That said, you can’t go far wrong with solution 2 above (USB 2.0 to DVI Full HD Adapter with VGA and HDMI Adapters), by all means contact us at consult@creativeconnections.co.uk and we will be happy to discuss your requirements.

A quick way to type lots of dummy text in Word

A quick way to type dummy text in Word

Applies to:  Word 2007, Word 2010, Word 2013, Word 2016

Here’s a tip for you when you want to add dummy text when you are for example testing page layout in Word.

Type =rand() and press Enter. To control the number of paragraphs and the number of sentences in each paragraph type =rand(p,s) where p represents the number of paragraphs and s the number of sentences.

Try it!

Eliminating Widows and Orphans in your Word documents

What are widows and orphans in document formatting?

Applies to: Word 2010, Word 2013, Word 2016

Widows and Orphans are the terms referring to lines left on their own either at the beginning or end of the page of a multi-page document.

Widow: a line on its own at the beginning of the next page
Orphan: a line on its own at the end of the page

As in (example of widow – heading left on its own at the bottom of the page):

Side heading

__________________________________(page break here)
Text for following paragraph…..

“Widow and Orphan control” is a tricky little feature that behaves differently in different versions of Word.
Ideally, your Side Heading style should be set up to ensure that Widows and Orphan control is on, and that “Keep with next” is selected.

If, however, you are not using styles in your Word document (I highly recommend this for greater control over you documents), you can use a quick fix in the above situation:

  1. Place your cursor in the Side Heading paragraph* (*if you have added an empty line to create space after the heading you will need to select this as well)
  2. Click the Home tab and click the down arrow in the bottom right corner of the Paragraph section
  3. Select Line and Page Breaks
  4. Check that Widow/Orphan control is ticked
  5. Tick Keep with next